Love, Peace, and Equality<3

THE SCARF OF SEXUAL PREFERENCE
{ wear }

sailorsetsuna:

owning-my-truth:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

sayofthelivinganything:

blackhiiipstress:

muzungus:

thugger-thugger:

theacebooncoon:

niafarai:

thetrillestqueen:

obesityrehab:

why touch her hair though? Dammit…

Reason number 45-60754280865’11B I won’t go on a mission trip.

I am soooo done

Mission trips make me sick

ugh


This baby girl is being treated like a tourist attraction or a wild animal and I am not here for this. This picture says so much about the owner of that white hand.

This photo makes me feel so uncomfortable

this photo makes me fucking angry.and a mission trip? .. yeah, aka colonialism.

Get OUT of our countries with this fucking bullshit, honestly. Missionaries are already fucking so much up in African countries. As a gay Nigerian I LIVE the repercussions of this daily. I’ve been exorcised, had bibles thrown at me, been sent to priests for a “cure”, been given spiritual baths which burn my skin to “wash the devil out of me” you name it. Done by my own family and people at the behest of “our Lord and Savior”. It’s traumatic, and especially hurtful when we understand that general acceptance of same sex love and eroticism and more nuanced, varied understandings of gender were the norm PRIOR to colonization and missionary activity.
And then we have pictures like this to remind us of the OTHER bullshit these missionary fuckers do. They roll up in our countries as “white saviors” and are constantly doing racist bullshit like this. Objectifying us, casting us as “primitive” and in need of being saved from ourselves and our “heathen” ways. Let’s not even start on the rampant sexual abuses priests committed against Africans across the continent. The ways in which they destroyed and suppressed our cultures. Made us hate ourselves to the point that today we call our own grandfathers and grandmothers with traditional beliefs “despicable heathens” and Satanists. Where they have so warped our cultures, identities and understanding of self, to fit THEIR white colonial mold.
We forget that missionaries came as colonizers first and foremost, and in many cases caused far more egregious and long lasting damage than the colonial administrators themselves. And they are still doing it today. Look at the rise of Christian fundamentalism in Africa in the last 30 years and you will see a direct correlation with a rise in hate and animus against same sex loving and trans people in many African countries. Watch the movie “God Loves Uganda” if you don’t believe me: the legacy and impact of missionaries on Africa is DAMNING and is getting WORSE, especially for those of us who identify as LGBTQ.
It makes me sick. This picture makes me sick. Missionaries make me sick. What they have done to our cultures and communities and traditions makes me sick. Their racism cloaked with a smile and their “good Book” makes me sick. The fact that they think that they’re “doing good” while they’re just reproducing white supremacist patriarchal colonial structures of control, domination and subjugation makes me sick. They don’t see us as full people, but as spectacles for their white gaze, as this picture makes so bitingly clear, and they don’t give a damn as long as they make their God “happy”
You have caused so much pain in my life and that of many of my friends. It hurts.
GET THE FUCK OUT OF AFRICA (or wherever this pic was taken) AND LEAVE OUR CHILDREN ALONE!!!!
And a big fuck you to all of the people doing mission “service trips” to ~*aFRicA*~ too. 
 
I’m utterly and completely done.

same applies to all those ‘volunteer abroad’ bullshit trips as well stop using poc poverty as filler for your lackluster resumes 

sailorsetsuna:

owning-my-truth:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

sayofthelivinganything:

blackhiiipstress:

muzungus:

thugger-thugger:

theacebooncoon:

niafarai:

thetrillestqueen:

obesityrehab:

why touch her hair though? Dammit…

Reason number 45-60754280865’11B I won’t go on a mission trip.

I am soooo done

Mission trips make me sick

ugh

This baby girl is being treated like a tourist attraction or a wild animal and I am not here for this. This picture says so much about the owner of that white hand.

This photo makes me feel so uncomfortable

this photo makes me fucking angry.

and a mission trip? .. yeah, aka colonialism.

Get OUT of our countries with this fucking bullshit, honestly. Missionaries are already fucking so much up in African countries. As a gay Nigerian I LIVE the repercussions of this daily. I’ve been exorcised, had bibles thrown at me, been sent to priests for a “cure”, been given spiritual baths which burn my skin to “wash the devil out of me” you name it. Done by my own family and people at the behest of “our Lord and Savior”. It’s traumatic, and especially hurtful when we understand that general acceptance of same sex love and eroticism and more nuanced, varied understandings of gender were the norm PRIOR to colonization and missionary activity.

And then we have pictures like this to remind us of the OTHER bullshit these missionary fuckers do. They roll up in our countries as “white saviors” and are constantly doing racist bullshit like this. Objectifying us, casting us as “primitive” and in need of being saved from ourselves and our “heathen” ways. Let’s not even start on the rampant sexual abuses priests committed against Africans across the continent. The ways in which they destroyed and suppressed our cultures. Made us hate ourselves to the point that today we call our own grandfathers and grandmothers with traditional beliefs “despicable heathens” and Satanists. Where they have so warped our cultures, identities and understanding of self, to fit THEIR white colonial mold.

We forget that missionaries came as colonizers first and foremost, and in many cases caused far more egregious and long lasting damage than the colonial administrators themselves. And they are still doing it today. Look at the rise of Christian fundamentalism in Africa in the last 30 years and you will see a direct correlation with a rise in hate and animus against same sex loving and trans people in many African countries. Watch the movie “God Loves Uganda” if you don’t believe me: the legacy and impact of missionaries on Africa is DAMNING and is getting WORSE, especially for those of us who identify as LGBTQ.

It makes me sick. This picture makes me sick. Missionaries make me sick. What they have done to our cultures and communities and traditions makes me sick. Their racism cloaked with a smile and their “good Book” makes me sick. The fact that they think that they’re “doing good” while they’re just reproducing white supremacist patriarchal colonial structures of control, domination and subjugation makes me sick. They don’t see us as full people, but as spectacles for their white gaze, as this picture makes so bitingly clear, and they don’t give a damn as long as they make their God “happy”

You have caused so much pain in my life and that of many of my friends. It hurts.

GET THE FUCK OUT OF AFRICA (or wherever this pic was taken) AND LEAVE OUR CHILDREN ALONE!!!!

And a big fuck you to all of the people doing mission “service trips” to ~*aFRicA*~ too. 

 

I’m utterly and completely done.

same applies to all those ‘volunteer abroad’ bullshit trips as well stop using poc poverty as filler for your lackluster resumes 

(Source: and--lo)

ryanjdavis:

An Open Letter to Pope Francis From The Ali Forney Center’s Carl Siciliano, That Appeared in The New York Times
Your Holiness,
I write to you as a Roman Catholic, a former Benedictine monk and as a gay man who has spent over 30 years serving the homeless, first as a member of the Catholic Worker Movement, and now as the founder and Executive Director of the Ali Forney Center, America’s largest center for homeless lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth based in New York City.
I write on behalf of the homeless LGBT youths I serve. I ask you to take urgent action to protect them from the devastating consequences of religious rejection, which is the most common reason LGBT youths are driven from their homes. At the heart of the problem is that the church still teaches that homosexual conduct is a sin, and that being gay is disordered. I hope that if you understand how this teaching tears families apart and brings suffering to innocent youths, you will end this teaching and prevent your bishops from fighting against the acceptance of LGBT people as equal members of society.
I hope that you will open your heart to the suffering of our youths. As LGBT youths are finding the courage to speak the truths of their hearts at younger ages, epidemic numbers are being rejected by their families and driven to homelessness. The number of youths enduring this cruel fate is staggering; last year at least 200,000 LGBT youths experienced homelessness in the United States. LGBT youths make up 40 percent of the homeless youth population in this country, despite comprising only about five percent of the overall youth population.
A recent study of family rejection found that parents with high religious involvement were significantly less accepting of their LGBT children. Over the past decade thousands of LGBT youths have come to the Ali Forney Center seeking safe shelter, from across our nation and the globe, bearing witness to having been driven from their homes by religious parents who believed they were evil and sinful. What these youths endure is horrific. They endure the torment of being unloved and unwanted by their parents, combined with the ordeals of hunger, cold and sexual exploitation while homeless. LGBT youths who are rejected by their families are eight times more likely to attempt suicide than LGBT youths whose parents accept them.
The Roman Catholic Church is the largest and most influential Christian organization in the world. By teaching that homosexual conduct is a sin, and that the homosexual orientation is disordered, it influences countless parents and families in societies across the globe to reject their children. In the name of these children, and in light of the love and compassion at the heart of the message of Jesus, I ask that you end this teaching.
Jesus Christ is never recorded as having said a word in judgment or condemnation of homosexuality or of LGBT people. He spoke of a loving, compassionate God, and commanded his followers to act with love and compassion. Jesus spoke of God as a loving parent who would never abandon his children.
There are biblical writings endorsing conduct now recognized as wrong; passages endorsing the rape of enemies’ wives and the murder of their children, endorsing slavery and even genocide. None of those biblical instructions are maintained as church teachings, as they are recognized to be cruel and immoral, and reflective of the ignorance of more primitive times. I ask you to recognize that the condemnation of homosexuality is also cruel and wrong, and rooted in a primitive, obsolete understanding of human sexuality. I ask you to join the growing number of church communities and religious denominations who have chosen to welcome and embrace us with love and acceptance.
A teaching’s wisdom and efficacy must be judged in part by its outcome. The teaching that homosexual conduct is a sin has a poisonous outcome, bearing fruit in many Christian parents who abandon their LGBT children to homelessness and destitution. How could a good seed yield such a bitter harvest?
For me this tragedy has many human faces. I see Justin, whose mother, before throwing him out of his home, summoned a priest who held him to the ground and tried to drive the devil out of the 16 year old boy. Or Terry, who was sent to a Catholic religion class where the instructor set him aside as someone “possessed by demons.” When his mother threw him out, she said that she would rather he die in the streets than live in her home if he was gay. I recall Maria, whose family drove her to a forest far from her home and abandoned her, throwing her from the car, because being a lesbian made her “evil.” I think of the boy whose name I never learned whose father was so disgusted by homosexuality that he threw his son out of his home and said he would kill him and bury him in the backyard if he tried to return.
I greatly respect you as a leader who has shown deep concern for the plight of the poor. I invite you to the Ali Forney Center, to meet our abandoned youths and see for yourself how their lives have been devastated and made destitute by religious rejection. I believe that there is no more compelling witness to the harmfulness of the condemnation of homosexuality than the consequent suffering plainly visible in the eyes of our homeless LGBT youths.
We share a belief in a God of love. I know in my heart that what my kids have suffered is ultimately a violation against love. How tragic it is that the church, through it’s teaching, would contribute to such a violation. Surely God loves his children more than teachings.
I hope that you will take up my offer to come to the Ali Forney Center and meet the youths we serve. And I hope that we can find common ground in seeking that they be protected and loved.
Sincerely,
 Carl Siciliano
Donate to The Ali Forney Center here
This letter originally appeared in the New York Times as a advertisement paid for by MItchell Gold + Bob Williams (in partnership with Faith in America) who are celebrating their 25th Anniversary and raising awareness of critical issues in communities across the country. Ryan Davis serves on The Board of Directors of The Ali Forney Center

ryanjdavis:

An Open Letter to Pope Francis From The Ali Forney Center’s Carl Siciliano, That Appeared in The New York Times

Your Holiness,

I write to you as a Roman Catholic, a former Benedictine monk and as a gay man who has spent over 30 years serving the homeless, first as a member of the Catholic Worker Movement, and now as the founder and Executive Director of the Ali Forney Center, America’s largest center for homeless lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth based in New York City.

I write on behalf of the homeless LGBT youths I serve. I ask you to take urgent action to protect them from the devastating consequences of religious rejection, which is the most common reason LGBT youths are driven from their homes. At the heart of the problem is that the church still teaches that homosexual conduct is a sin, and that being gay is disordered. I hope that if you understand how this teaching tears families apart and brings suffering to innocent youths, you will end this teaching and prevent your bishops from fighting against the acceptance of LGBT people as equal members of society.

I hope that you will open your heart to the suffering of our youths. As LGBT youths are finding the courage to speak the truths of their hearts at younger ages, epidemic numbers are being rejected by their families and driven to homelessness. The number of youths enduring this cruel fate is staggering; last year at least 200,000 LGBT youths experienced homelessness in the United States. LGBT youths make up 40 percent of the homeless youth population in this country, despite comprising only about five percent of the overall youth population.

A recent study of family rejection found that parents with high religious involvement were significantly less accepting of their LGBT children. Over the past decade thousands of LGBT youths have come to the Ali Forney Center seeking safe shelter, from across our nation and the globe, bearing witness to having been driven from their homes by religious parents who believed they were evil and sinful. What these youths endure is horrific. They endure the torment of being unloved and unwanted by their parents, combined with the ordeals of hunger, cold and sexual exploitation while homeless. LGBT youths who are rejected by their families are eight times more likely to attempt suicide than LGBT youths whose parents accept them.

The Roman Catholic Church is the largest and most influential Christian organization in the world. By teaching that homosexual conduct is a sin, and that the homosexual orientation is disordered, it influences countless parents and families in societies across the globe to reject their children. In the name of these children, and in light of the love and compassion at the heart of the message of Jesus, I ask that you end this teaching.

Jesus Christ is never recorded as having said a word in judgment or condemnation of homosexuality or of LGBT people. He spoke of a loving, compassionate God, and commanded his followers to act with love and compassion. Jesus spoke of God as a loving parent who would never abandon his children.

There are biblical writings endorsing conduct now recognized as wrong; passages endorsing the rape of enemies’ wives and the murder of their children, endorsing slavery and even genocide. None of those biblical instructions are maintained as church teachings, as they are recognized to be cruel and immoral, and reflective of the ignorance of more primitive times. I ask you to recognize that the condemnation of homosexuality is also cruel and wrong, and rooted in a primitive, obsolete understanding of human sexuality. I ask you to join the growing number of church communities and religious denominations who have chosen to welcome and embrace us with love and acceptance.

A teaching’s wisdom and efficacy must be judged in part by its outcome. The teaching that homosexual conduct is a sin has a poisonous outcome, bearing fruit in many Christian parents who abandon their LGBT children to homelessness and destitution. How could a good seed yield such a bitter harvest?

For me this tragedy has many human faces. I see Justin, whose mother, before throwing him out of his home, summoned a priest who held him to the ground and tried to drive the devil out of the 16 year old boy. Or Terry, who was sent to a Catholic religion class where the instructor set him aside as someone “possessed by demons.” When his mother threw him out, she said that she would rather he die in the streets than live in her home if he was gay. I recall Maria, whose family drove her to a forest far from her home and abandoned her, throwing her from the car, because being a lesbian made her “evil.” I think of the boy whose name I never learned whose father was so disgusted by homosexuality that he threw his son out of his home and said he would kill him and bury him in the backyard if he tried to return.

I greatly respect you as a leader who has shown deep concern for the plight of the poor. I invite you to the Ali Forney Center, to meet our abandoned youths and see for yourself how their lives have been devastated and made destitute by religious rejection. I believe that there is no more compelling witness to the harmfulness of the condemnation of homosexuality than the consequent suffering plainly visible in the eyes of our homeless LGBT youths.

We share a belief in a God of love. I know in my heart that what my kids have suffered is ultimately a violation against love. How tragic it is that the church, through it’s teaching, would contribute to such a violation. Surely God loves his children more than teachings.

I hope that you will take up my offer to come to the Ali Forney Center and meet the youths we serve. And I hope that we can find common ground in seeking that they be protected and loved.

Sincerely,


Carl Siciliano

Donate to The Ali Forney Center here

This letter originally appeared in the New York Times as a advertisement paid for by MItchell Gold + Bob Williams (in partnership with Faith in America) who are celebrating their 25th Anniversary and raising awareness of critical issues in communities across the country. Ryan Davis serves on The Board of Directors of The Ali Forney Center

polarbear-fishbiscuits:

wannabefashionjournalist:

al-the-stuff-i-like:

To think that some people don’t see a problem with society is disturbing

it’s not just disturbing, it’s fucking scary. 

Y’all “rape culture doesn’t exist” preachers can fuck RIGHT off

ignatius-m:


icecooly94:

teacupnosaucer:

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because “Who hired a stripper” shouldn’t be the first thing said to me when I walk into a welding job.

women in trades are treated like such fucking shit. 

NO I’M STILL STUCK ON THIS WHY WOULD ANYONE SAY THIS TO A WOMAN HOLDING A BLOWTORCH

SOMEONE WHO INTENSELY WANTS TO BE ON FIRE. \*anti-patriarchy angry faces\*

ignatius-m:

icecooly94:

teacupnosaucer:

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because “Who hired a stripper” shouldn’t be the first thing said to me when I walk into a welding job.

women in trades are treated like such fucking shit. 

NO I’M STILL STUCK ON THIS WHY WOULD ANYONE SAY THIS TO A WOMAN HOLDING A BLOWTORCH

SOMEONE WHO INTENSELY WANTS TO BE ON FIRE. \*anti-patriarchy angry faces\*

domesticsexgoddess:

a-flairforthedramatics:

strangelyobsessedwithstuff:

fit-healthy-marion:

fitisfashion:

the truest comic ever

love

yes 
this is perfection

I was not expecting the last one

Awesome

(Source: symphonyofawesomeness)

That movie fucked my mind in a bad way.

Watching Requiem for a dream tonight, i love Jared Leto.

This is me about 3 times a day
  • This is me about 3 times a day

(Source: twisted-nerd)

gaywrites:

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton yesterday signed a bill strengthening anti-bullying measures in schools, including protecting LGBT students. 

The new law will require schools to track and investigate cases of bullying, as well as require school staff be trained in preventing bullying. It is enumerated to protect students who are targeted for anything from sexual orientation and gender identity to physical appearance and welfare status.

It was passed overnight after a long House debate and will go into effect for the 2014-2015 school year.

At Kenny Elementary School in Minneapolis, bullying prevention is already front and center.

“We have so many of these things in place right now,” said Bill Gibbs, the school’s principal.

Teachers already get positive behavior training, and students learn about bullying on their first day of school.

“We talk to the kids that we never tease anyone about where their family comes from, what their skin color is, whether boys like boys or boys like girls,” Gibbs said.

Awesome, awesome news for Minnesota. We’re well on our way to making this a national standard. 

(Source: lgbtqblogs)